119-123 Louisiana Avenue

The Munger Meat Market

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Supporting the preservation and appreciation of Perrysburg's historic architectural heritage

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The Munger Meat Market:

 

One of Perrysburg's interesting downtown commercial buildings is this three unit structure, each unit painted a different pastel color. It is at 119-123 Louisiana Avenue.

Like several other buildings in this old part of downtown, it is almost impossible to untangle who built it and when, in the 1800s. It is not even known if it is actually three units built separately but now with a common facade. One suspicious clue is that the upper windows in the right unit are larger than the others. But most likely it (or they) replaced other earlier frame buildings torn down or lost to fire.

market

119-123 Louisiana Avenue

James Manning Hall, merchant and one-time postmaster, owned all or part of the space in 1837. Other owners before the turn of the century were Jesse Norton, Gilbert Beach, George W. and John Hoffman and George and John Munger. The latter brothers operated a meat market at the 123 address for almost 50 years. In more modern times, Piatt's Bakery was a long-time fixture at the 119 address in the left unit.

About the building itself, it is called transitional, between Greek Revival and Commercial Italianate. Its most noticeable feature is the corbelled cornice at the roof line. Behind the flat-topped façade is a low-gable roof.

Since Munger's Meat Market is historically most often associated with the building, we will mention that George Munger was among one of the first German families to settle in Perrysburg in 1847. Taking over as the oldest of seven children when their father died, he got involved with cattle and opened a butcher shop and slaughter house. He became good enough at judging cattle that he was offered, but turned down, a position with Swift & Company in Chicago. Instead, he remained a Perrysburg resident long active in civic affairs. Among other things, he served on the Village council and the water works board.

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